Surgical Options
home
Select Language

Colorectal Conditions:

Colorectal Cancer, Diverticulitis, Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn’s Disease, Rectal Prolapse

Surgery Options

Depending on the type of disease or stage, doctors may recommend a colectomy or low anterior resection procedure. These procedures are explained below.

Colectomy: There are several types of operations that can be performed on the colon.

  • Colectomy/Colon Resection: Surgeons remove the diseased part of the colon and join together the remaining healthy bowel
  • Right Colectomy: Surgery is performed on the right colon
  • Left Colectomy: Surgery is performed on the left colon
  • Sigmoid Colectomy: Surgery is performed on the sigmoid colon (lower left part of the colon before the rectum)
  • Total Colectomy: The entire colon is removed during surgery

Low Anterior Resection: For patients diagnosed with rectal cancer, surgeons may perform a low anterior resection (LAR). During surgery, doctors connect the rectum to the colon after removing the cancer. If the disease or cancer is too close to the anus, the surgeon may also need to remove the rectum, anus and part of the sigmoid colon. This is known as an abdominoperineal resection or APR.

Surgical Approaches

If surgery is recommended, some common surgical approaches include:

Open Surgery: With open surgery, doctors make a large incision in the abdomen. The exact size of the incision will depend on the type of procedure being performed. Open surgery, also called laparotomy, allows doctors to touch and feel key organs as they operate.

Minimally Invasive Surgery

Laparoscopy: With laparoscopy, the surgeon stands next to the patient and operates through a few small incisions using long, straight instruments and a tiny camera. The 3-dimensional high definition (3D HD) camera provides a magnified view inside the patient’s body. The camera sends images to a video monitor in the operating room to guide doctors as they operate.

Robotic-Assisted Surgery: During robotic-assisted surgery, the surgeon sits at a console near the patient and controls the instruments, which bend and rotate. The surgeon uses a 3D HD vision system which provides a magnified view inside the patient’s body. The system translates all hand movements into smaller, precise movements of tiny instruments in the patient’s body.

The system translates all hand movements into smaller, precise movements of tiny instruments in the patient’s body. Surgeons who use robotic-assisted surgery can operate through a few small incisions in the abdomen.


Important Information for Patients
Serious complications may occur in any surgery, up to and including death. Individual surgical results may vary. Patients should talk to their doctor to decide what is right for them. Patients and doctors should review all available information on non-surgical and surgical options in order to make an informed decision.

All people depicted unless otherwise noted are models. © 2015 Intuitive Surgical. PN 1023878 Rev A 11/2015